A very long article to hide questionable aspects of a Congresswoman designed to LOOK complete, but is really designed to REDIRECT the rhetoric to blame America, AGAIN

July 20, 2019

The below is a disinformation article, the epitome of PROPAGANDA, which is WHAT her grandpa specialized in and daddy too.  They were “teachers.” Really?  What kind?  and WHAT was taught?

 

 

Ilhan Omar’s improbable journey from refugee camp to Minnesota Legislature

itemprop

The night sky mirrors Ilhan Omar’s mood: gray and funky. The 33-year-old Somali-born Minnesotan is known for keeping her face toward the sun. But on this August eve her Crest White smile hibernates.

 

Omar gazes at the floor. There will be no talk tonight about moving “forward together.”

Omar needs time to feel sad. Not because she’s ashamed of something she did, but because choices in her past are hurting people she loves, especially her three kids.

“My [13-year-old] daughter is old enough, she sees and hears things, and I can’t protect her,” Omar says. “She’s starting to ask questions. What I don’t understand is why is it every time the TV stations have a story about my shit they use a picture of our whole family?”

Two weeks before, Omar was the belle of the ball. Her DFL primary win over Mohamud Noor and 44-year incumbent Phyllis Kahn catapulted the former refugee to the doorway of the Minnesota House. Come November, Omar will become America’s highest-ranking Somali elected to office. (Her Republican opponent, Abdimalik Askar, suspended his campaign in August.)

Allegations of bigamy and immigration fraud arrived 72 hours later. What was a political career primed for flight was now battered on the tarmac.

During the heaviest days of the marriage controversy, Omar “could’ve cared less” about her uncertain political fortunes. It was her kids she was thinking about.

During the heaviest days of the marriage controversy, Omar “could’ve cared less” about her uncertain political fortunes. It was her kids she was thinking about.

Omar gazes at the floor. There will be no talk tonight about moving “forward together.”

Omar needs time to feel sad. Not because she’s ashamed of something she did, but because choices in her past are hurting people she loves, especially her three kids.

————me

this is specifically designed to usher sympathy – the chiiiiiiiiiiiildren

———————————

“My [13-year-old] daughter is old enough, she sees and hears things, and I can’t protect her,” Omar says. “She’s starting to ask questions. What I don’t understand is why is it every time the TV stations have a story about my shit they use a picture of our whole family?”

———————me

Really? And they – the liberals – have the nerve to say Trump is filthy.  these women are truly NASTY WOMEN.  She’s soo concerned about what her children hear that she’s okay with vulgar language.  This is an example of what she thinks of America.  She has NO respect for her language or her position or ANYTHING.  I served my country to pay it back in some small way for taking me in as a REFUGEE from the USSR.  I’m not an Omar style refugee.  I’m grateful and respectful of her and the people of this great country.  She doesn’t deserve her great fortune of being a REPRESENTATIVE of any people, let alone that people that saved her and took this snake in. 

——————————–

Two weeks before, Omar was the belle of the ball. Her DFL primary win over Mohamud Noor and 44-year incumbent Phyllis Kahn catapulted the former refugee to the doorway of the Minnesota House. Come November, Omar will become America’s highest-ranking Somali elected to office. (Her Republican opponent, Abdimalik Askar, suspended his campaign in August.)

Allegations of bigamy and immigration fraud arrived 72 hours later. What was a political career primed for flight was now battered on the tarmac.

During the heaviest days of the marriage controversy, Omar “could’ve cared less” about her uncertain political fortunes. It was her kids she was thinking about.

During the heaviest days of the marriage controversy, Omar “could’ve cared less” about her uncertain political fortunes. It was her kids she was thinking about.

“If she can come out of this, I think she’ll emerge as a more powerful figure,” says Hamline University professor David Schultz. “People love her kind of story. It represents a new kind of leader in Minnesota politics. At this point who knows how this will play out.”

Omar knows. She rights her turtled posture, sits straight, and peers out the window. She’s reminded of what her grandfather taught her when she was a little girl in Somalia.

“Everything is temporary,” Baba Abukar said.

“Everything is temporary,” Omar repeats. “But right now, I am sad. Sad and angry.”

Mogadishu to Minneapolis

Omar was born into a village of her own, the youngest of seven.

———–me

what was the cause of death?

———————-

Her mother died when she was little. Men would shape her. Three older brothers, father Nur Omar Mohamed, and her grandfather, Abukar, especially.

—————-me

please go to this article regarding her family

https://txlady706.wordpress.com/2019/05/18/ilhan-omar-a-congresswoman-has-ties-to-the-communist-somali-dictator-mohammed-siad-barre-whom-the-omar-family-served-media-knows-and-is-hiding-this-information-media-treason/ via @txlady706

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Aunts and uncles worked as civil servants and educators. Omar’s father trained teachers. Theirs was a blessed life as Somalia began the transition from European colony to independence.

————me

Somalia was a failed state and Somali pirates were the worst. 

Somalia – that place where some Congresswomen come from how does a person leave a failed state run under a Communist dictator?

————————————————–

Her grandfather rode the winds of change to Italy, where he attended university.He returned to his East African homeland, becoming Somalia’s National Marine Transport director. Abukar oversaw the string of lighthouses along the Arabian Sea coastline.

———————me

were they helping smugglers? Somalian coast was INFAMOUS for it’s pirates 

———–

Privilege accompanied this kind of pedigree. Books and culture were priorities inside the home, which was more like a compound, complete with domestic help. In a country where 80 percent of the population farmed and raised livestock, Omar started kindergarten at age four.

But Somalia was a fragile country. Civil strife soon threatened to swallow it.

About 12 million people occupy this land about the size of Texas. It’s overwhelmingly Muslim. Genealogy unites and divides.

Somalis belong to clans. These ethnic cliques can be about geography or marriage. Some possess age-old beliefs of superiority and consider members of sub-clans unsuitable for marriage, even friendship.

 

In 1991, the reign of Somali President Siad Barre imploded.The country had had enough of his Cold War-style military dictatorship. Barre was ousted, the national army disbanded. The ensuing vacuum devolved into a war among clans, turning neighbors into enemies. Omar witnessed this firsthand when she was eight years old.

————-me

this involved her grandpa and dad also.  See the article (https://txlady706.wordpress.com/2019/05/18/ilhan-omar-a-congresswoman-has-ties-to-the-communist-somali-dictator-mohammed-siad-barre-whom-the-omar-family-served-media-knows-and-is-hiding-this-information-media-treason/ via @txlady706)

————-

Nighttime fell as about 20 people milled about the compound in Mogadishu, the Somali capital. Bad noises outside announced unwelcome visitors. Men with big guns demanded to be let in. The group tried to bust down the front door, but it was unbreakable. Omar and her family fell to the floor moments before the militiamen let go a staccato of gunfire. Once they were satisfied with the evening’s damage, the attackers left.

“She was so present, so sincere in her beliefs about issues,” says Minneapolis City Council candidate Andrew Johnson about the first time he met Omar in early 2014.

“She was so present, so sincere in her beliefs about issues,” says Minneapolis City Council candidate Andrew Johnson about the first time he met Omar in early 2014.

 

Everyone survived. Omar hasn’t forgotten the sight of bullet pockmarks in the building’s cinderblock walls.

Shellshock turned to grief for Omar’s grandpa.

“That was a hard realization for my grandfather, that our family was no longer welcome,” she says. “Even after the attack, he struggled with this new reality.”

————me

Her family was trying to help a Communist warlord, but maybe it would have been better than just a WARLORD?

————-

Days later, they put their familiar world in the rearview mirror. They split into groups, 20 people in total fleeing. Omar’s headed for the coast where Abukar had connections. Alongside her father, she hopped a plane for Kenya.

“You go from knowing a life of certainty and joy to one where everything is uncertain,” she says. “My family chose to go to Kenya because my grandfather had contacts there.”

She lived with strangers in and around Nairobi. Memories of waking up each day feeling fear left mental scars.

Her dad and grandpa looked for a new country to call home. But immigration to a place like Canada, England, or the U.S. wasn’t happening anytime soon. At least Kenya wouldn’t kick them out.

According to the University of Minnesota’s Lawrence Jacobs, “the real political ingenuity” of Omar is her ability “to speak to multiple communities.”

According to the University of Minnesota’s Lawrence Jacobs, “the real political ingenuity” of Omar is her ability “to speak to multiple communities.”

 

When the goodwill of Abukar’s contacts expired, two bad choices were left: live on the streets of Nairobi, a city of 10 million, or go to one of the refugee camps within Kenya.

The Utanga camp outside the coastal hub of Mombasa splayed across four square miles. Beneath the trees of the jungle canopy were beige tents as far as the eye could see.

Somalis made up most of the camp’s 30,000 refugees. Waiting to use an outhouse could eat up half the day. The threat of malaria was 24/7. The same could be said for personal safety — for some more than others.

Kidnappings for ransom loomed as the largest rogue activity at the UN camp. Since kidnappers usually targeted heads of families, Omar was tasked with fetching firewood and water. The routine lasted four years.

Finally, a Lutheran church sponsored Omar and her family for entry into the U.S.

—-me ——an NGO with no ties to faith BTW———–

Her American education began with orientation videos courtesy of the federal government.

“There were ones about grocery stores. What a highway looked like. It introduced you to what a shopping mall was,” says Omar. “It was green lawns and white townhouses…. Everything is beautiful. Everything is grandiose. Everything is just. All of these polished things you sell to the outside world.”

———-me – sounds like she take offense to the “excesses” of America, which create an atmosphere where people can AFFORD to be generous and CHARITABLE to create charities like the type she USED to get to America from the Kenyan camps.  Yet she sounds hateful————

City Council Member Abdi Warsame says that two years ago Omar “wasn’t that important.” That’s no longer the case.

City Council Member Abdi Warsame says that two years ago Omar “wasn’t that important.” That’s no longer the case.

Their plane landed in New York City. Staring out a car window, Omar, age 12, felt ripped off. This wasn’t the same country as the one in the videos. Instead, it was a headache of car horns and homelessness, an eyesore of trash and graffiti.

She turned to her father in disbelief: “This doesn’t look like the America you promised.”

We’re getting to our America, Ilhan, he replied. You have to be patient.

They made the 230-mile drive south to Arlington, Virginia. It wasn’t long before Omar was sitting at a school desk. Her English at the time consisted of “hello” and “shut up.”

—————me —- she is absolute filth

Classmates stuck gum to her headscarf when they weren’t trying to yank it off. None of her peers bothered to communicate, even to say hi. They stared instead. The new kid sat solo at lunch, a loner during recess as well.

Omar’s English improved. Then came her classmates’ questions: Does it feel good to wear shoes for the first time? Do you really have hair? Do you have a pet monkey?

“I’d say the kids were curiously brutal,” says Omar, “but the lunch ladies were kind to me.”

Back at the home where she lived with her father and siblings, change would again be in the works. Omar’s dad and older sister Sahra were having conversations about better schools, prospects of economic mobility, and becoming part of an already-established East African immigrant community.

Their road trip took place in the summer after Omar finished eighth grade. They were headed to a new land, where they’d heard “the people there were supposed to be nice,” Omar says.

The journey would end in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis.

The teenager grew into a young woman over the next four years. She’d graduate from Edison High.

Omar credits Abukar for first exposing her to politics. In 1997, her grandfather planned to attend the DFL precinct caucus at the Brian Coyle Center. But he needed his 14-year-old granddaughter to act as translator.

—-me—————

the same grandfather that was a propagandist for the over throw of a country

——————–

Omar’s eyes grew big walking into the bright lights, rainbows of campaign signs, and hundreds of conversations in different languages.

“The whole thing was just big. Not just physically with a lot of people, but what it was a part of,” she says. “There was this platform. People could put forth ideas that could contribute. Knowing a conversation in a small room with someone could be released into the universe and become part of something much larger, there was something intoxicating about it for me.”

Omar wanted more. She reached out to those she believed could teach her.

————–me

Who? did she reach out to and HOW did she find them and know to “reachout” to them?

What? Did she do to REACH out?  why would they listen?  What was her pitch?  When was this exactly?

——————–

 

Jamal Abdulahi was one of them. Ten years her elder, Abdulahi would one day become a state DFL director and chair of the party’s Somali caucus.

————me—grandfather connection?

“At our first meeting over coffee, I sensed she was the kind of a newcomer to politics with enough ideas that with minimum guidance she would go out and figure out the rest,” he says. “Even then, she was pretty explicit she wanted to get involved in organizing and electoral politics. I told her to go to her precinct caucus.”

She studied political science at North Dakota State, then returned to Minneapolis to work at the University of Minnesota.She’d show up at DFL meetings, volunteering whenever she could. Plunging into the deep end of activism meant serving on the boards of the Legal Rights Center, a nonprofit law firm specializing in restorative justice, and the Confederation of Somali Community in Minnesota, a charity working to integrate new immigrants.

 

 

As Omar intertwined grassroots advocacy and party politics, her profile grew. Not everyone would embrace it. She knew this would happen.

“Political power in Somalia rests with men,” she says.

“I think there is a feeling by some people in politics and in my own community that the woman can think she’s leading all that she wants, have a semblance of influence, but the ultimate voice rests with the man…. I am not one who subscribes to that belief.”

Omar vs. Warsame

By early 2014, the former refugee had grown into her own kind of American-style multi-tasker. Her longtime yet imperfect relationship with Ahmed Hirsi had been blessed with three children.She worked as a public health educator, teaching about good eating habits while moonlighting in activism.

———me

what? what does that mean? This is intentionally conveluted

————-

The latter brought her face to face with little-known Minneapolis City Council candidate Andrew Johnson.

A twentysomething IT geek and campaign greenhorn, Johnson decided he’d run for a seat representing the city’s southeastern neighborhoods of Longfellow, Nokomis East, and Standish-Ericsson.

With Johnson canvassing for early support, Omar vetted the rookie candidate on behalf of the New Americans, an East African political action committee.

Johnson was struck.

 

She was so present, so sincere in her beliefs about issues,” he says.

Johnson would eventually tap Omar to be his campaign manager. Together, they’d win the council race. She’d serve as his policy advisor, which afforded observers an infrequent portal into the jockeying within Somali politics.

The day before February 2014’s precinct caucus in Cedar-Riverside, Abdi Warsame, the first-term Minneapolis city councilman whose ward captures a large portion of the East African immigrant community, called Johnson into his office.

Warsame had become the highest elected Somali-American official in the U.S. four months earlier. He wanted Johnson to pass a message to Omar.

“Warsame told… Johnson he should warn [Omar] to stay away from the caucus or there could be trouble for her,” MinnPost reporters James Nord and Briana Bierschbach would report.

The message baffled Johnson as he made the short walk back to his office. Omar’s tears multiplied as he explained what had transpired.

————–me

this is a ploy designed to garner sympathy – my guess – daddy got some thugs and went over to the other side and gave them some verbals – they then passed a message back — and really thats ALL that was needed

———————–

 

“I didn’t know what exactly he meant,” Johnson tells City Pages. “I told her no one should tell you to stay home and not be involved in democracy. That’s ridiculous.”

Warsame denies the conversation ever took place.

 

“This was an attempt to besmirch my name,” he says. “I don’t know why people would say that. I know we live in a very biased society…. When you happen to be one of the only Muslim, black, immigrant, and Somali elected officials, of course people want to throw mud at you.”

—–me
planned and executed accordingly
———————

Hundreds crowded the precinct meeting. Omar’s job as a district vice chair was to ensure there was no chicanery.

An hour before the scheduled start, a group of supporters for Mohamud Noor, a Minneapolis School Board member vying to unseat state Rep. Phyllis Kahn, had congregated inside the building. Attendees would later describe the event’s energy as charged, and not in a good way.

A contingent of Kahn’s faithful soon walked in. An argument between the camps disintegrated into swinging arms and cocked legs.

A group of what was reported to be five people converged on Omar. She’d suffer a busted lip and a concussion.

Warsame says he wasn’t at the caucus, although it was no secret he supported Kahn.

Omar would become a Noor campaign volunteer.

Warsame still dismisses the notion he and Omar are somehow adversaries.

 

“You also have to remember, in 2014, Ms. Omar wasn’t that important,” Warsame says. “As I said, I don’t know her very well.”

The diplomacy is lost on Omar. She characterizes Warsame as an old-school bully and modern-day sexist.

“I think the disdain between us stems from that first conversation he had with… Johnson,” she says. “I have never understood or appreciated [Warsame’s] brand of misogyny…. To say I have a voice, that the women in our community won’t be silenced, I believe is ultimately what led to me being attacked.”

Body parts ached and brain funk hadn’t fully lifted as Omar arrived for work the morning after the attack.

Her eldest daughter urged her to get back to her City Hall desk ASAP. The girl said she needed to show the people who want to intimidate her that “they don’t have control over you.”

Noor would eventually lose to Kahn. A year later, Omar decided to try for the seat herself.

The future revealed

The faithful shuffled into a Minneapolis middle school last April for the DFL nominating convention. Three candidates vied for the party’s official nod: Kahn, Noor, and Omar.

Omar appeared primed for victory. As Johnson’s campaign manager, she’d learned what it meant to hump on the election trail. Omar employed a two-pronged strategy of connecting with university students while cultivating support and chipping away at the stubborn resistance inside her own community.

Omar scored 55 percent of the delegates, 23 points ahead of Kahn. But she still needed Noor to direct his single-digit support to her camp. Eleven votes was all that stood between her and the all-too-important party endorsement.

The event ended in a stalemate. The DFL primary in August would be a three-way race.

Hudda Ibrahim, a St. Cloud Tech and Community College faculty member and editor-in-chief at Somalicurrent.com, has an explanation.

“[Noor] cannot lose to a Somali woman,” she says. “So when a woman is running for office, our male-dominated society will try to undermine the woman.”

(Noor did not respond to repeated interview requests. Rep. Kahn could not be reached for comment.)

Nasser Mussa, a former Humphrey School of Public Affairs fellow who’s known Omar for years, watched silently as the primary neared. People inside the district were telling him plenty.

“She was doing a good job of using old-fashioned political tools, mobilizing people, and organizing across economic lines,” says Mussa. “People forget that you don’t win the district with support from just one group or another. You need a coalition.”

 

That was proving to be no easy task. There were some votes Omar would never get.

“I had women in my community tell me, ‘Ilhan, I want to vote for you, but my husband won’t allow it,’” she says.

The skyscrapers of downtown Minneapolis watched as a Seward restaurant pulsed on an August night. Hundreds packed Omar’s primary headquarters at Kalsan Restaurant. They roared minutes past 10 when media outlets reported her victory, a triumph that found its way to the pages of the New York Times.

Omar was swallowed in hugs. Young women looked on, crying.

“Her political success drew on her Somali identity, but it was much more than that,” University of Minnesota professor Lawrence Jacobs says. “I think that the real political ingenuity of Ilhan Omar was her being able to speak to multiple communities rather than being the spokesperson for one ethnic community.”

The night belonged to Omar. Controversy would steal it.

“The shit show”

Soon, a new story emerged from the conservative blogosphere: Omar had been married to two men at once, and one was her brother.

 

Power Line’s Scott Johnson reported that Omar married Hirsi in 2002. Seven years later, Johnson alleged, she wed “her brother Ahmed Nur Said Elmi,” which would make her guilty of “marriage and immigration fraud” and bigamy.

——–me

this is called, confess to everything and then plead mercy and necessity — and the best -NO ALTERNATIVE — because all these clever people can think up all different ways for other things, but not this

———-

Johnson had a document showing Omar had pulled a marriage license application in 2002, but never officially registered it with the state. She’d wed Elmi in 2009, a Minnesota marriage certificate proved. But the blogger lacked proof that Omar and Elmi were blood relatives.

The unsubstantiated report grew into a media maelstrom. Stories appeared in the Star Tribune and City Pages, as well as on WCCO, FOX 9, and KSTP.

“I look at the soap opera, the shit show of what people might consider to be in their discovery of things, there isn’t anything to what’s being insinuated or anything there to bite me in the ass,” Omar says. “What I’m surprised about are… the particular things that are appropriate to insinuate without any legitimacy or facts. I think if certain factors weren’t in play, this wouldn’t be considered acceptable.”

—-me

filthy mouth – just like the rest of the Communist female whores.  Who talks that way in public? and to someone conducting an interview?

——————-

Former deputy Republican Party state chairman Michael Brodkorb says that’s true — to a point. Omar’s tale was being reported through the optics of a presidential race, which has been awash with talk of border walls and mass deportations. At the same time, Omar hasn’t done herself any favors, says Brodkorb. Power Line’s story elicited two statements from her camp. The first chalked up the charges to “Donald Trump-style misogyny, racism, anti-immigration rhetoric, and Islamophobic division.”

“I think she ratcheted up some of the rhetoric with that response,” Brodkorb says. “Most Minnesotans would think, ‘Are you married?’ to be an easy question to answer. Since it hasn’t been for her, I think that’s alarming to some.”

In this political season, such seeming evasiveness makes for rich soil. As a result, Brodkorb isn’t surprised “to see a candidate with Omar’s background being targeted.”

But, he adds, “There appear to be lingering questions.”

 

Omar’s explanation goes like this: While they were never officially married under Minnesota law, Hirsi is her husband, her life partner, and father of her kids.

The couple fell out of love sometime before 2009. During that period, Omar legally married Elmi. She and Elmi eventually separated. Omar reconciled with Hirsi in 2011, marrying in their “faith tradition,” a commitment that’s recognized within their community, but not under Minnesota law. She has yet to legally divorce Elmi.

“There are particular challenges to getting a legal divorce,” Omar says. “One of those is getting the cooperation and presence of the other person who you are divorcing.”

Elmi resides in England. He couldn’t be reached for comment. Omar wouldn’t permit City Pages to talk to Hirsi, saying, “I have never made my personal life part of my platform, my campaign. So no, that’s not going to happen.”

 

——————-me – from what I know – you don’t have to have the consent of the other party to divorce.  That went out a long time ago

————-

Omar vs. Warsame, Part II

During the campaign homestretch, Omar exhales.

She sits pensively inside a Seward coffee shop. Her legs are crossed. She wears pink-and-orange flip-flops, her top foot twitching while she fidgets with the bracelets on her wrist.

Her Crest White smile returns. Her vibe is lighter, yet Omar admits she struggles to reconcile some of what’s transpired.

“What’s been hard to come to terms with is how these people have been really reckless,” says Omar.

—————–me

she’s learned how to project well – SHE is the RECKLESS one

———–

She fingers some within her own community for planting the marriage story.

“You have to think, who benefits from lessening my influence and my power?” says Omar. “Those within my community who have had power and influence, who are now going to have to come to terms with a woman more powerful, more notable, more high in stature and political standing… previously elected officials within my community, that’s who comes to mind.”

————-me

wow! this woman is out for blood and she will destroy anyone getting in her way.  She is out for revenge.  This is a viper

——————

She names Warsame, saying, “I think the kind of power I was growing and cultivating was going to be too much for someone like him.”

What kind of pull that will be remains debatable. Johnson says the marriage story was never intended to take Omar down. If it was, it would have been leaked before the primary.

“If you think about the timing, it’s obvious it was intended to diminish her image from day one of walking into the Legislature,” he says. “She had the real opportunity to walk in and make connections with folks who don’t usually work with Somalis and really open up some minds. Instead, there’ll be those who think, ‘Oh there’s that Muslim woman who married her brother.’”

Hamline professor Schultz concurs. As he sees it, “the crude swipe” was designed to injure right off the bat: “Maybe damaging a rising star is enough and that’s what you wanted to achieve.”

Warsame has no time to answer “tabloid” questions. He denies having any connection to the leak, saying, “I was just as shocked as everyone else when it came out.”

Instead, he prefers to talk about his accomplishments, like “giving” Cedar-Riverside newly paved roads when the old ones had resembled something in “the Third World.”

“Ms. Omar is on her way to become an elected official in the state of Minnesota,” he continues. “I’m proud of that because that’s part of my work. I’m proud Ms. Omar came after me…. Her election would pose no problem for me. What I can say is [she’s] a vindication for my work.”

When asked to respond to Warsame’s comments, Omar doesn’t. Her slight smile is a mix of indignation and resigned humor. She knows there will be “some public discomfort” with a Muslim woman as a state lawmaker.

“I consider myself to be a fighter who’s pretty optimistic about the possibilities of the world, and someone who thinks we all have shared values regardless of our background, our faith,” Omar says.

Correction: An earlier version of this story stated that Rep. Phyllis Kahn did not respond to repeated interview requests. Through a miscommunication on the part of City Pages, Rep. Kahn was not given adequate opportunity to respond. We regret the error.

http://www.citypages.com/news/ilhan-omars-improbable-journey-from-refugee-camp-to-minnesota-legislature/398441901

 

 

 


Private airplane, private Island, and private crime. Child trafficking with Epstein, a predator and pedophile

July 20, 2019

 

 

“THE GIRLS WERE JUST SO YOUNG”: THE HORRORS OF JEFFREY EPSTEIN’S PRIVATE ISLAND

Locals say Epstein was flying in underage girls long after his conviction for sex crimes—and authorities did nothing to stop him. “It was like he was flaunting it,” says an employee at the airstrip on St. Thomas. “But it was said that he always tipped really well, so everyone overlooked it.”

A view of Little St. James Island in the U. S. Virgin Islands a property owned by Jeffrey Epstein. The 66yearold...
A view of Little St. James Island, in the U. S. Virgin Islands, a property owned by Jeffrey Epstein. The 66-year-old billionaire bought the property about a decade ago and began to transform it, clearing the native vegetation, ringing the property with towering palm trees and planting two massive U.S. flags on either end.

Ever since billionaire Jeffrey Epstein was arrested on July 6 on charges of sex trafficking, the media have been scrambling to make sense of what happened on Little St. James, his 70-acre private island in the Caribbean. But on nearby St. Thomas, locals say Epstein continued to bring underage girls to the island as recently as this year—a decade after he was forced to register as a convicted sex offender—and that authorities did nothing to stop him.

Two employees who worked at the local airstrip on St. Thomas tell Vanity Fair that they witnessed Epstein boarding his private plane on multiple occasions in the company of girls who appeared to be under the age of consent. According to the employees, the girls arrived with Epstein aboard one of his two Gulfstream jets. Between January 2018 and June 2019, previously published flight records show, the jets were airborne at least one out of every three days. They stopped all over the world, sometimes for only a few hours at a time: Paris, London, Slovakia, Mexico, Morocco. When they left St. Thomas, the employees say, they returned to airports near Epstein’s homes in Palm Beach and New York City.

“On multiple occasions I saw Epstein exit his helicopter, stand on the tarmac in full view of my tower, and board his private jet with children—female children,” says a former air traffic controller at the airstrip who asked to remain anonymous. “One incident in particular really stands out in my mind, because the girls were just so young. They couldn’t have been over 16. Epstein looked very angry and hurled his jacket at one of them. They were also carrying shopping bags from stores not on the island. I remember thinking, ‘Where in the world have they been shopping?’”

Another employee at the airstrip, who requested anonymity because he is not allowed to speak about travelers in his official capacity, says Epstein would land at St. Thomas twice a month on average. “There’d be girls that look like they could be in high school,” the employee recalls. “They looked very young. They were always wearing college sweatshirts. It seemed like camouflage, that’s the best way to put it.” Epstein would be dressed in a tracksuit, but the girls carried shopping bags from designer labels: Gucci, Dior.

The employee adds that he and his co-workers would joke around about what they were seeing. “Every time he landed or took off, it was always brought up. We’d always be joking, ‘How many kids are on board this time?’” But the employee also says he felt “pure disgust,” calling it “absolutely insane” that a convicted sex offender was able to move around so openly in the era of MeToo.

“I could see him with my own eyes,” the employee says. “I compared it to seeing a serial killer in broad daylight. I called it the face of evil.”

Epstein apparently made no attempt to hide his travels with young girls. The airstrip in St. Thomas sits in plain sight of a central highway, and a nearby parking lot at the University of the Virgin Islands provides a complete view of the tarmac and almost every aircraft on the ground. When he’s “home” on Little St. James, Epstein’s plane is always parked right in front of the control tower.

“The fact that young girls were getting out of his helicopter and getting into his plane, it was like he was flaunting it,” the employee says. “But it was said that he always tipped really well, so everyone overlooked it.”

In fact, it appears that local authorities did nothing to investigate Epstein’s repeated trips with young girls—let alone intervene—despite the fact that he was listed on the island’s registry of sex offenders. Chief William Harvey, a veteran of the Virgin Islands police department, tells Vanity Fair that he does not know who Epstein is, and is unaware of any investigation into him. Sammuel Sanes, a former senator for the Virgin Islands, says he is unaware of any special precautions taken by law enforcement to track the arrivals and departures of Epstein’s jet on St. Thomas, or the movements of his helicopter to and from his private island.

Lawyers for Epstein, who has pleaded not guilty to the charges of sex trafficking, say he “flatly denies any illegal involvement with underage women.” But those on the island who witnessed Epstein in action remain shocked that a convicted pedophile could brazenly continue to travel to and from the United States accompanied by young girls.

“My colleagues and I definitely talked about how we didn’t understand how this guy was still allowed to be around children,” says the former air traffic controller. “We didn’t say anything because we figured law enforcement was doing their job. I have to say that that is regrettable, but we really didn’t even know who to tell, or if anyone really cared.”

More Great Stories from Vanity Fair

— How Paul Manafort tricked Donald Trump into making Mike Pence his V.P.

— How Trump kept tabs on Jeffrey Epstein

— Inside John F. Kennedy Jr.’s lifelong struggle

— Matt Lauer, the Trumps, and a Very Page Six Summer in the Hamptons

— The prestige-TV drama roiling HBO

Looking for more? Sign up for our daily Hive newsletter and never miss a story.

 

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2019/07/horrors-of-jeffrey-epstein-private-island?utm_social-type=owned&utm_medium=social&mbid=social_twitter&utm_brand=vf&utm_source=twitter


Patriotism is required to recruit in the military. The numbers are suffering and the MILITARY is looking to 16 year olds!!!!! I hope the media is proud of themselves. They are not proud of America

July 20, 2019
PATRIOTISM?  when you have THIS representing the USA?  When you keep being told by those who REPRESENT YOU that you are horrible?  Why fight for it?  Why choose America?  They make the case against her.  They are vile and evil and unPatriotic.  They are unAMERICAN and are doing her harm. 

Military eyes 16-year-olds as ranks and candidates dwindle

In this June 4, 2017, file photo. nNew Army recruits take part in a swearing in ceremony before a baseball game between the San Diego Padres and the Colorado Rockies in San Diego. The Army has missed its recruiting goal for the first time in more than a decade. Army leaders tell The Associated Press they signed up about 70,000 new troops for the fiscal year that ends Sept. 30, 2018. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
In this June 4, 2017, file photo. nNew Army recruits take part in a swearing in ceremony before a baseball game between the San Diego Padres and the Colorado Rockies in San Diego. The Army has missed its recruiting goal … more >
– The Washington Times – Thursday, July 18, 2019

The best way to fix the U.S. armed forces’ recruiting challenges may involve dipping further into the nation’s high schools.

As the Army, Navy and other services contend with a thriving economy and a directive to expand their ranks, there is a growing debate over whether the military should consider lowering the minimum enlistment age from 17 to 16. More than a dozen countries, including the United Kingdom, already have adopted the policy.

Critics say the idea is deeply flawed and presents a host of societal problems, but supporters argue that the Pentagon needs to think outside the box if it wants to continually overcome one of the toughest recruiting environments in decades.

Neither the military nor lawmakers have given any indication that they are entertaining the idea, but some analysts say that opening the ranks to younger Americans could provide unique benefits and may be the kind of fundamental overhaul the recruiting system needs for the 21st century.

“For one, many of the factors that disqualify older youths from joining — like criminal records — are not as present in younger teens,” said Shane McCarthy, chief marketing officer of Sandboxx, a leading technology platform that connects military members stationed abroad with families and friends at home. Mr. McCarthy also has advised military commands on how to better target recruits.


“Currently, of the 75% of 17- to 24-year-olds who are ineligible to serve, for example, 10% are ineligible due to criminal records,” he wrote in a recent piece for the Military Times. “And, according to the Department of Justice, there are twice as many arrests of 18- to 20-year-olds as there are arrests of 15- to 17-year-olds.”

Mr. McCarthy’s argument touched off a firestorm, with skeptics saying the move could create more problems than it would solve. Peter Warren Singer, a senior fellow at the Washington think tank New America, countered that lowering the enlistment age to 16 would undermine combat effectiveness and unit cohesion and create other problems.Mr. Singer, author of the book “Children at War,” also said the very idea shows a “misunderstanding [of] the different brain chemistry of youths and their ability to make informed judgment” and would destroy “the day-to-day lives of the poor drill instructors and commanders of these teens’ first unit.”

He made his case in a piece for the military-focused website Task & Purpose

 

Despite those and other concerns, the notion certainly isn’t new. At least 13 nations allow enlistees younger than 17, according to the CIA World Factbook. They include major powers such as the United Kingdom and smaller countries with much less capable militaries, such as Tonga, Bolivia and Papua New Guinea.

In the U.S., analysts say, there is a lack of data about the issue and it’s unclear exactly what effects military services would encounter if they begin admitting younger teens.

“I think the broader answer about all of this is we really don’t know,” said Beth J. Asch, a senior economist at the Rand Corp. who studies military recruiting. “There’s no current research on what the effects would be, how would it expand the market, their qualifications. We don’t know.”

Like other analysts, Ms. Asch said she believes the idea of signing up 16-year-olds has been off the table for decades and remains so today.

But the discussion underscores the armed forces’ systemic recruiting challenges.

Last year, the Army fell short of its recruiting goal for the first time in a decade. The Army had set a goal of 76,500 recruits and pulled in just under 70,000, according to Defense Department figures.

The Army and all other branches of the military expect to meet this year’s targets, but officials readily acknowledge that the recruiting environment is as difficult as ever, largely because of a soaring economy, a consistently low unemployment rate and more economic opportunities in the private sector for young Americans who otherwise might consider military service.

Analysts say that recruiting 16-year-olds doesn’t seem to be the right solution, but they stress that the military can and must improve its outreach to younger teenagers.

“You have to compete and be in the marketplace, and that’s something the military doesn’t do very well,” said Rebecca Burgess, a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute who studies military and veterans issues. “It tells the story of itself that’s very traditional: ‘We’re freedom fighters doing good throughout the world; be part of our team.’ And it expects people to kind of come to them.”

That, she said, is why recruiting offices too often are found in dying shopping malls or other low-traffic sites rather than out in the community.

The military has taken serious steps in recent years to increase its visibility and engagement in the nation’s communities. The Army has launched a comprehensive recruiting program in major cities and said the approach already has paid huge dividends in the number of recruits from urban centers such as Baltimore and Minneapolis.

But analysts say the military’s past tack of using marketing slogans such as the Army’s “Be all you can be” mantra no longer works.

Instead, they say, the branches should craft multiple appeals centering on the host of benefits that come from military service, including educational assistance, patriotism, career benefits, and the host of jobs a man or woman can perform in the military outside of a combat zone.

“I think what’s happening now — and it’s not that messages aren’t important — but I think there’s a realization that different people are interested in different things,” said Ms. Asch. “It’s not one message. People want to join for a variety of reasons, so the message has to be somewhat tailored.

“The trick is to communicate all of that so people get the message they need to hear,” she said.

PATRIOTISM?  when you have THIS representing the USA?  When you keep being told by those who REPRESENT YOU that you are horrible?  Why fight for it?  Why choose America?  They make the case against her.  They are vile and evil and unPatriotic.  They are unAMERICAN and are doing her harm. 

 


While some countries see people busting out, America keeps being busted in and bum rushed at our borders.

July 20, 2019

Most countries seal their borders to keep people FROM leaving America is the envy of the world who keeps getting bum rushed by people trying to force their way in.  Can’t be too bad of a country when people are literally killing themselves to get in.

Yet, the liars in our country, REPRESENTATIVES of some places in this country, keep DENIGRATING the people that MAKE this country.  They are snakes.  They must be stopped.  They WANT us stopped.  They are the enemies of this country.

 

Image result for cbp agents bum rushed in TX

Image result for cbp agents bum rushed in TX

call them snakes or the Jihad Squad, but they are bought and paid for :

 

 

Undocumented immigrants try to rush into US in ‘waves,’ spark showdown with CBP agents

 

The Pharr International Bridge in 2001

The Pharr International Bridge in 2001

 

One of the biggest ports of entry along the US-Mexico border had to be shut down on Friday after a group of undocumented immigrants — nearly 50 of them — attempted to rush into the United States in “waves,” according to federal officials.

The mad dash went down at the Pharr International Bridge in Texas at about 4 a.m., officials said, and sparked a showdown with Customs and Border Protection agents.

“A group of 47 undocumented individuals attempted to illegally enter the United States in three waves,” the agency said in a statement, according to KGBT.

“Ignoring commands to stop, the group suddenly rushed the temporary barricades, bent metal poles and disabled the concertina wire affixed to the barrier.”

Several CBP officers were assaulted during the mayhem but expected to be OK. They had to deploy tear gas and pepper balls in order to stop the group.

At least 16 of the immigrants were taken into custody by federal officers. Mexican authorities took the remaining individuals.

 

https://nypost.com/2019/07/19/undocumented-immigrants-try-to-rush-into-us-in-waves-spark-showdown-with-cbp-agents/

 


Liberal Somalis journalist “goes home” and proves Trump right – its a bad idea and AMERICA is a paradise in comparison. Dies proving it !

July 20, 2019

Somalia is a racist, sexist, xenophobic, Judaeo – Christa phobic sh!* hole.  And the Progressive Communists can’t change it.  They are too weak from all the lies.  Islam is evil and can stay in Africa and the MiddleEast.

Don’t bring it to America – it’s a death sentence

Related image

Mogadishu on JumPic.com

JumPic.com

Sado Ali and Hodan Nalayeh came back to help their nation. However they were killed

Image result for Hodan Nalayeh

Hodan Nalayeh: How she became a voice of a generation of Somalis – CNN

CNN.com

TOPSHOT – A man passes in front of the rubbles of the popular Medina hotel of

Journalist Travels to Ilhan Omar’s Homeland to Prove Somalia is Beautiful, Debunk ‘Stereotypes’ – Gets Killed by Islamic Terrorists


Hodan Nalayeh

Hodan Nalayeh, a Somali-born Canadian journalist traveled to Somalia last week to prove Somalia is “beautiful” and to challenge ‘stereotypes’ ended up being killed by Islamic terrorists.

Hodan Nalayeh returned to Somalia, the place of her birth, to document the beauty and to tell “uplifting” stories, according to WaPo.

Nalayeh often tweeted about Somalia and just last week posted pictures showing how much fun she was having in Kismayo and the neighboring island of Ilisi.

“It’s so clean & breathtaking. A perfect place for a day swim with the family,” Nalayeh tweeted just two days before she was killed.

One of Nalayeh’s Twitter followers praised her for “countering the doom narrative propagated by many about Somalia.”

On July 12, al-Shabaab terrorists stormed Asasey Hotel in Kismayo. 26 people were killed in the terrorist attack and Hodan Nalayeh, 43, and her husband were among the victims.

 

According to a Canadian news outlet, Nalayeh was pregnant when she was killed by al-Shabaab terrorists last week.

Now she’s dead.

So this journalist pretty much proved Trump’s point that Ilhan Omar is ‘lucky to be here’ (even though she defrauded US immigration to get here).

 

Journalist Travels to Ilhan Omar’s Homeland to Prove Somalia is Beautiful, Debunk ‘Stereotypes’ – Gets Killed by Islamic Terrorists


The Italian mob in NY

July 20, 2019

 

 

The real ‘Goodfellas’: Mafia and New York has always been match made in tabloid heaven

 

 

For Mafia chieftain Joe Bonanno, New York City was always “The Volcano.”

The Sicilian immigrant, who arrived in Brooklyn as a 3-year-old boy, viewed his adopted hometown as an ever-bubbling cauldron of money, power, betrayal and intrigue. Across the last 100 years, the Daily News covered all of it: Mob busts, mob trials, mob hits, mob wars.

 

Italian organized crime in the city is roughly the same age as the tabloid, with the five New York Mafia families spawned in the early 1930s following the bloody 18-month Castellammarese War. The internecine conflict led to the Coney Island execution of mob leader Giuseppe “Joe the Boss” Masseria, gunned down in a restaurant during a post-lunch card game.

A photographer famously snapped a photo of the dead boss still clutching the ace of spades in one hand.

 

As The News marks its centennial, the mob is still making headlines with the murder of reputed Gambino family boss Frank “Frankie Boy” Cali outside his Staten Island home and the death behind bars of legendary Colombo family boss Carmine “Junior” Persico.

It’s no accident that “The Godfather” and “Goodfellas” were both set in the city, home to the riveting real-life crime families known as the Gambinos, the Colombos, the Genovese, the Bonannos and the Lucheses.

The American Mafia’s founding fathers settled in the five boroughs, including seminal headline-making gangsters like Albert “Mad Hatter” Anastasia, Charles “Lucky” Luciano and Vito Genovese.

In 1957, Anastasia was executed in a barber’s chair at the Park Sheraton Hotel (“MASKED PAIR KILL ANASTASIA,” the headline read), Luciano was deported and died in Naples (“LUCKY ESCAPED ARREST — EVEN IF IT KILLED HIM”) and Genovese met his maker while locked inside a federal prison (”JAIL GENOVESE ON DRUG RAP”).

The body of Albert Anastasia, reputed chief executioner of Murder Inc., lies on the barbershop floor of the Park-Sheraton Hotel on W. 55th St. (Tom Baffler/New York Daily News)
The body of Albert Anastasia, reputed chief executioner of Murder Inc., lies on the barbershop floor of the Park-Sheraton Hotel on W. 55th St. (Tom Baffler/New York Daily News)

The News chronicled Mafia rats like Sammy “The Bull” Gravano and Mafia cops Louis Eppolito and Steve Caracappa, who improbably sold their NYPD badges to become organized crime hit men.

The infamous 1957 mob summit busted by authorities in upstate Apalachin, N.Y., made page one: “SEIZE 62 MAFIA CHIEFTAINS IN UPSTATE RAID.”

But more often than not, it was mob deaths that became front page news.

 

Bathrobe-clad Vincent (The Chin) Gigante in custody and placed under arrest. (Jack Smith/New York Daily News)

Bathrobe-clad Vincent (The Chin) Gigante in custody and placed under arrest. (Jack Smith/New York Daily News)

“Retirement, mob style,” offered a photo caption beneath the gruesome shot of slain Bonanno family boss Carmine Galante, his post-luncheon cigar still clenched in his teeth in June 1979.

There was the December 1985 execution of Gambino boss Big Paul Castellano and his driver outside Sparks Steak House: “RUBOUT.”

The April 1972 whacking of flamboyant gangster Joey Gallo inside Umberto’s Clam House in Little Italy produced this Daily News epitaph: “CRAZY JOEY LIVED UP TO HIS NAME & DIED FOR IT.”

RELATED GALLERY
True ‘Goodfellas’: A look back at the long history of the Mafia and NYC

Even the October 1975 death of a leader under far less dire circumstances made Page One: “CARLO GAMBINO DIES IN BED.”

Genovese boss Vincent “The Chin” Gigante became a staple of mob coverage while avoiding arrest with a unique scam: He faked mental illness, wandering the streets of Greenwich Village in a bathrobe and slippers while running the power crime family for nearly two decades.

RELATED GALLERY

 

 


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