The Bilderberg group of BANKING – Basel III – The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, which comprises officials from 27 countries including the United States, is updating its rules in hopes of preventing a recurrence of the 2008 financial meltdown.

Scary.

This is Global Communism.

We were never asked if we wanted to join.

This all originates from the NEW DEAL Franklin Delano Roosevelt32nd President of the United States.  This president SOLD the US to the Communists.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Deal

The NEW DEAL – is a bad deal.  It accomplished, in one stroke of the pen, everything that the CIVIL WAR could not in rivers of blood.

Your schools never taught you this.

Your government spun this in to something that was deemed good.  For the good of the WORKER is a Communist slogan.  For the GOOD of the People is a Communist manifesto.  The only people that benefit in the end are the people that REGULATE YOU.

Top left: The Tennessee Valley Authority, part of the New Deal, being signed into law in 1933. Top right: Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who was responsible for initiatives and programs collectively known as the New Deal. Bottom: A public mural from one of the artists employed by the New Deal.

Top left: The Tennessee Valley Authority, part of the New Deal, being signed into law in 1933. Top right: Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who was responsible for initiatives and programs collectively known as the New Deal. Bottom: A public mural from one of the artists employed by the New Deal.

Those who seek to NEVER let it happen again through controls and measures, are the ones who impose MEASURES for YOU.  Nothing is too small to regulate, especially when they sing the mantra that everyone must suffer a little for the good of the many.  They conveniently exclude themselves from either condition, either the worker or the industry.  They are the policy makers, and therefore exempt.

We need FEWER policy makers.  Especially policy makers that RULE THE GLOBE.

Bankers turn a wary eye on Basel:

Posted by Colin Barr

September 10, 2010 6:33 am

Regulators are expected to release guidelines Sunday spelling out the size and type of capital cushion banks must hold against losses. The  Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, which comprises officials from 27 countries including the United States, is updating its rules in hopes of preventing a recurrence of the 2008 financial meltdown.

Looking for a green light

The new policies, known as Basel III, will be enforced by local bank watchdogs such as the Federal Reserve and will take effect over a period of years. It was just three years ago that the Fed announced rules implementing Basel II, which officials praised at the time as “promoting the resiliency of the banking and financial systems.”

It didn’t exactly work out that way, obviously, and this time policymakers have pledged to get it right – which means banks will have to set aside more capital and have less leeway to puff up their capital bases by counting things likedeferred tax assets, which have little value when bank stocks plunge in a panic.

Here are the key issues the committee is expected to decide on this weekend:

  • The minimum size of the so-called core capital cushion – the funds banks accumulate by selling stock and retaining profits. It is expected to rise to at least 7% of risk-weighted assets from the current 2%.
  • The degree to which too-big-to-fail banks, those that pose a risk to the financial system should they fail, might have to hold more capital than smaller ones.
  • The rules under which banks might be forced to hold more capital during an economic boom, or be permitted to use capital to offset losses in a downturn.

Worries about the impact of the tougher Basel rules have shaken European markets this week. Barclays (BCS) tumbled Tuesday on concerns that new rules may force it to raise new capital, and Deutsche Bank (DB) slipped Thursday on reports it is considering an $11 billion stock sale.

Because U.S. banks spent much of the last two years raising new money in the market and building up their profits thanks to the free-money policies of the Federal Reserve, the new rules may not have as big an immediate impact on the likes of Bank of America (BAC) and JPMorgan Chase (JPM).

Rise and Fall of Political Parties in the Unit...

Image by Cornell University Library via Flickr

“Large-caps could potentially be overcapitalized as soon as 2011, even when assuming higher regulatory capital standards,” Baird analyst David George wrote last month.

He and other analysts say that while big U.S. lenders will be under regulatory pressure in coming months to keep building capital by retaining earnings, some big banks may soon have enough funds on hand to start raising dividends that were slashed during the crisis.

Because they will apply everywhere, the Basel policies have been the subject of intense lobbying — particularly by Japan and the biggest European nations, whose banks tend to be less robustly capitalized than those in the United States and the United Kingdom.

German bankers, for instance, say they will have to raise more than $100 billion to comply with the new rules if they impose a 10% Tier 1 capital ratio.

Recent reports suggest the final proposal will have been watered down somewhat, in part on the argument that now is not the time to crack down on banks and further compress lending,compromising a weak recovery.

And while the profit outlook for U.S. banks looks fairly drab, with the economy weak and in no apparent hurry to get stronger, a sense that we know what the new capital rules will look like could at least give investors something to look forward to.

“Assuming Basel III capital guidelines are reasonable, we believe a select few banks will feel more comfortable with share repurchases and/or increased dividends in the not too distant future,” Stifel Nicolaus analyst Christopher Mutascio wrote this week in a note to clients.

He said PNC (PNC), US Bancorp (USB) and Wells Fargo (WFC) will be among the first to raise dividends and resume stock buybacks

http://finance.fortune.cnn.com/2010/09/10/bankers-turn-a-nervous-eye-on-basel/

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12 Responses to The Bilderberg group of BANKING – Basel III – The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, which comprises officials from 27 countries including the United States, is updating its rules in hopes of preventing a recurrence of the 2008 financial meltdown.

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