Mexico – Santiago close to Monterrey NL- Mayor Edelmiro Cavazos – body dumped in his home town street

There is more than one war being waged.  Lest we forget.

They are connected in ways, but the war with ISLAM and the war with the Mexican invasion is not completely two separate wars.  The bad guys are interconnected.  They use each other.  The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

Body of kidnapped mayor dumped in northern Mexico:

Main Image

By Robin Emmott

MONTERREY | Wed Aug 18, 2010 5:49pm EDT

Mexico (Reuters) – Security forces found the body of a slain mayor on Wednesday near Mexico’s richest city, days after he was abducted by hitmen in the latest attack on a public official from increasingly bold drug cartels.

Edelmiro Cavazos

Edelmiro Cavazos

President Felipe Calderon, who has staked his presidency on a faltering drug war, condemned the “cowardly assassination” of Edelmiro Cavazos, the mayor of a town on the outskirts of Monterrey, an industrial center with close U.S. business ties.

Following President Felipe Calderón’s third annual Informe and President Barack Obama’s health care speech in early September, both presidents find themselves attempting to sell reform to their respective nations

Following President Felipe Calderón’s third annual Informe and President Barack Obama’s health care speech in early September, both presidents find themselves attempting to sell reform to their respective nations

“The murder of Edelmiro is an outrage and forces us to redouble our efforts to fight these cowardly criminals,” Calderon wrote in a Twitter update.

Cavazos, a 38-year-old, U.S.-educated mayor from Calderon’s conservative National Action Party, was found dumped on a rural road early on Wednesday outside his town of Santiago. He was blindfolded and his hands were tied.

Heavily armed soldiers swarmed the crime scene while frightened residents of the popular colonial tourist town stayed indoors, leaving normally busy streets deserted.

The attorney general in the border state of Nuevo Leon, which includes Santiago and Monterrey, which is 140 miles from Texas, confirmed the body discovered was Cavazos’ and said drug cartels were behind the killing.

Nuevo Leon Governor Rodrigo Medina urged Calderon to send more troops to Monterrey and surrounding areas, echoing a plea published on Wednesday from Mexican business groups in a full-page statement in local newspapers.

Medina said this week that Cavazos, who took office last year, was probably targeted for his efforts to clean up Santiago’s corrupt police force, part of a nationwide effort to curb endemic police graft. The mayor of the San Pedro Garza Garcia municipality, part of Monterrey, said drug gangs threatened Cavazos directly late last year.

“When the mayor took office, he told me that criminal groups had gone to see him, saying: either you join us or we eliminate you,” Mayor Mauricio Fernandez told local radio.

Santiago, a popular weekend getaway for Monterrey residents, has also become a staging post for drug gangs smuggling narcotics north into the United States. Many capos have taken refuge in mansions nestled in surrounding hills.

More than 28,000 people, mainly drug traffickers and police, have been killed in Mexico’s drug war since December 2006, intensifying worries in Washington about the stability of the United States’ oil-producing neighbor.

Interior Minister Francisco Blake was due in Monterrey later in the day to discuss the killing with local leaders.

INVESTMENT ON HOLD

The death of Cavazos, a father of three who was taken from his home on Sunday night, is the first attack on a public official by suspected cartels in Nuevo Leon, a manufacturing hub once seen as a model for other developing nations.

Drug violence has surged in Monterrey, where per capita income is double Mexico’s average, since a dispute between the powerful Gulf cartel and the Zetas, a brutal spinoff group, turned into all-out war since the start of this year.

That turf war is also terrorizing neighboring Tamaulipas state, where hitmen killed a candidate for governor in June, the highest level political killing in Mexico in 16 years.

Violence in Nuevo Leon is still well below the dramatic levels of border cities like Ciudad Juarez, but the violence in Monterrey is a challenge for Calderon as foreign companies begin to question the safety of doing business in Latin America’s second-largest economy.

“Insecurity in Monterrey is now spinning out of control and is a clear threat to investment. The city is losing its leadership,” said political analyst Jose Luis Garcia at the University of Monterrey. “Politicians … aren’t prepared to pay the price and confront the problems.”

Local business leader Juan Ernesto Sandoval warned this week that a nascent economic recovery in Nuevo Leon, after Mexico’s punishing downturn last year, was under threat.

“There are investment projects that are being frozen,” he said, pointing to a decision from one retail chain to put construction of stores and creation of 1,000 new jobs in Monterrey on hold.

(Additional reporting by Cyntia Barrera in Mexico City; editing by Missy Ryan and Cynthia Osterman)

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE67H2Z920100818

<hat tip Atrain718>

Nearly Half of United States Considering Arizona-Style Immigration Legislation:

Thursday, August 19, 2010
By Fred Lucas, Staff Writer

In this June 15, 2010 file photo, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer speaks in Phoenix. With the scrawl of a pen, Brewer awakened a dormant - but politically explosive - issue of illegal immigration, sending shock waves across the political spectrum in an election year when both parties had hoped to sidestep the topic. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

In this June 15, 2010 file photo, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer speaks in Phoenix. With the scrawl of a pen, Brewer awakened a dormant - but politically explosive - issue of illegal immigration, sending shock waves across the political spectrum in an election year when both parties had hoped to sidestep the topic. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

(CNSNews.com) – Twenty-two states are now in the process of drafting or seeking to pass legislation similar to Arizona’s law against illegal immigration. This is occurring despite the fact that the Obama administration has filed a lawsuit against the Arizona law and a federal judge has ruled against portions of that law – a ruling that is now being appealed.

Next month, two Rhode Island state lawmakers, a Democrat and a Republican, will travel to Arizona to speak with Republican Gov. Jan Brewer, local sheriffs, and other officials about how to better craft their own bipartisan immigration bill for Rhode Island, which already has been enforcing some federal immigration laws.

Meanwhile, 11 Republican state lawmakers from Colorado traveled to Arizona this week to meet with officials there on how to craft legislation for the Mile High state.

In addition, Alabama House Republicans announced this week that they would seek to “push an illegal immigration bill similar to the recently approved Arizona law.” This law would “create a new criminal trespass statute that allows local law enforcement to arrest illegal immigrants for simply setting foot in Alabama,” said Alabama’s House Minority Leader Mike Hubbard.

In Florida, proposed legislation against illegal immigration has been retooled to address some concerns raised by a federal judge who blocked the proposed bill, though it would still allow Florida state police to enforce immigration law.

In all, there are 22 states considering copycat legislation from the Arizona law against illegal immigration, according to the Americans for Legal Immigration Political Action Committee (ALIPAC), a group that advocates for stricter immigration enforcement.

These illegal immigrants, deported to Mexico on Wednesday, July 28, 2010, are shown near the Nogales Port of Entry in Sonora, Mexico. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

These illegal immigrants, deported to Mexico on Wednesday, July 28, 2010, are shown near the Nogales Port of Entry in Sonora, Mexico. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Arizona’s law mirrors federal law. It requires local law enforcement officers during a lawful stop to determine the immigration status of an individual by asking the person to show identification that residents are already required to carry by law; and it authorizes law enforcement to securely transfer verified illegal aliens to federal custody.

The law prohibits racial profiling and gives state residents the right to sue local agencies for not complying with the state law.

In the lawsuit challenging the Arizona law, the Obama administration said the United States should not have a “patchwork” of 50 different immigration laws. In late July, U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton ruled against most of the major elements of the Arizona law, halting their implementation.  That ruling is now in the appeals process.

“We do not expand on federal law,” Florida state Rep. William Snyder, the sponsor of the bill in his state, told CNSNews.com. “We do not change penalties. The goal is not to create a new immigration framework at the state level.”

Snyder, the chairman of the Florida House Criminal Justice Committee, said his staff attorneys have taken the decision by U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton into consideration in re-crafting their bill for the next state legislative session.

Snyder said the office of state Attorney General Bill McCollum has reviewed the legislation, as have committee attorneys, and they believe it will withstand a potential legal challenge from the Obama administration.

McCollum, a GOP candidate for governor, supports the legislation. However, Gov. Charlie Crist, a Republican-turned-Independent candidate for U.S. Senate, opposes the proposal.

Alfredo Salas, 28, shows his license Thursday shortly after being pulled over and let off with a warning for a cracked windshield by the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office during a crime and immigration sweep. (AP Photo/Amanda Lee Myers)

Alfredo Salas, 28, shows his license Thursday shortly after being pulled over and let off with a warning for a cracked windshield by the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office during a crime and immigration sweep. (AP Photo/Amanda Lee Myers)

“We will continue to work with the language,” Snyder said.

In Rhode Island, a bill that was introduced late in the session last year, and thus never reached a vote, is expected to be reintroduced in the 2011 session. Its two lead co-sponsors hope to have a bipartisan bill that will withstand a legal challenge after they meet with Arizona officials.

“It exactly mirrors the Arizona law,” Rhode Island state Rep. Peter Palumbo, a Democrat, told CNSNews.com. “We will tweak the bill.”

Palumbo will be going to Arizona with Rhode Island state Rep. Joseph Trillo, a Republican.

Their legislation would essentially codify an existing executive order signed in 2008 by Gov. Donald Carcieri, a Republican, mandating immigration checks on all new state workers and ordering state police to assist federal immigration officials.

This is Carcieri’s final year in office, so Palumbo said it is important to put the force of law behind what has already been Rhode Island policy. State troopers report illegal immigrants they encounter for speeding and other offenses to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) office.

Because of the executive order in 2008, corruption was discovered in the Department of Motor Vehicles, with drivers licenses being sold to illegal aliens, Palumbo said.

In New Jersey, state Rep. Allison Little McHose, a Republican, introduced a series of proposals that focused primarily on requiring employers to verify the legality of workers, and preventing state benefits from going to illegal aliens.

“New Jersey continues to be a sanctuary state for illegals because they know they can come to the state and receive many free benefits, like medical care,” McHose said in a statement. “The benefits may be free for those receiving them, but not the rest of the public because these costs are borne by the taxpayers.”

Other states with proposals that mirror the Arizona law are Arkansas, Idaho, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Utah.

“We are very pleased to announce 22 states are now following Arizona’s lead to pass versions of a law that has the support of 60 percent to 81 percent of Americans according to polls,” said ALIPAC President William Gheen in a statement. “State and federal candidates are rushing to display their support for Arizona’s law and immigration enforcement. We will not stop until all American states are protected from this invasion as mandated by the Constitution of the United States.”

http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/71294

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One Response to Mexico – Santiago close to Monterrey NL- Mayor Edelmiro Cavazos – body dumped in his home town street

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