Department of HOMEland Security – should be dismantled – this organization leaves the American people without security. This organization and it’s leaders should be investigated and charges of TREASON should be administered SWIFTLY and executed in the most transparent way possible.

DHS has left this country, not only open but, literally prone to enemy infiltration.

Janet Napolitano should be investigated and removed.  – As the FIRST order of business.

DHS answers to who? They don’t really answer to anyone it looks like.  But Janet Napolitano has always been an OBAMA butt wiper.

EXCLUSIVE: DHS Caught and Released 481 ‘Fugitive’ Illegals from State Sponsors of Terror and ‘Countries of Interest’:

(CNSNews.com EXCLUSIVE) – In the three fiscal years from 2007-2009, the Department of Homeland Security caught and released 481 illegal aliens from nations designated as state sponsors of terrorism and “countries of interest,” and those 481 aliens are now fugitives, according to an Immigration and Customs Enforcement database obtained by CNSNews.com as the result of a Freedom of Information Act request.

The four state sponsors of terrorism, as determined by the State Department, are Iran, Syria, Sudan and Cuba. The “countries of interest” are those additional countries whose citizens have been subjected to enhanced screening on U.S.-bound flights by the Transportation Security Administration as a result of the attempted Christmas Day bombing of Northwest Flight 253.

On Jan. 3, 2010, TSA said in a statement that the agency was “mandating that every individual flying into the U.S. from anywhere in the world who holds a passport issued by or is traveling from or through nations that are state sponsors of terrorism or other countries of interest will be required to go through enhanced screening.” TSA did not specify which nations it considered “countries of interest.”

But a Jan. 4, 2010 New York Times report, citing Obama administration officials, identified them as Afghanistan, Algeria, Lebanon, Libya, Nigeria, Iraq, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Somalia and Yemen.

A report in USA Today that day, citing the TSA as the source, described the full list of nations whose citizens would be targeted for enhanced security checks as “14 countries with terrorism problems.”

The database that ICE provided to CNSNews.com includes the date that each illegal alien was taken into custody (booked in) by the federal government, the date they were released (booked out), which of the 24 regional ICE jurisdictions they were booked in, the status of the case (whether the person has been deported, the case against him has been withdrawn, or whether the case is still active, etc.), the category of the case (which includes whether the person is a fugitive), the gender of the alien and his or her country of citizenship. DHS withheld the names and birthdates of the aliens.

Attorney General Eric Holder, right, accompanied by Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, center, and New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, during a news conference to update the attempted bombing in Times Square, Tuesday, May 4, 2010, at Justice Department in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Attorney General Eric Holder, right, accompanied by Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, center, and New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, during a news conference to update the attempted bombing in Times Square, Tuesday, May 4, 2010, at Justice Department in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

For the three fiscal years 2007, 2008 and 2009, the database shows that there are 481 “active” cases for “fugitives” from the 4 state sponsors of terror and 9 of the 10 “countries of interest.” There are no active fugitive cases for Libyan nationals.

The total number of active fugitive cases involving citizens from the four state sponsors and the 10 countries of interest include:

Cuba-137
Nigeria-97
Pakistan-87
Lebanon-34
Iran-29
Iraq-26
Somalia-22
Sudan-14
Syria-13
Yemen-8
Algeria-8
Afghanistan-4
Saudi Arabia-2
Libya-0

ICE Spokeswoman Gillian Brigham told CNSNews.com that a “fugitive” as listed in the database is defined as an individual who has been found legally deportable and has evaded authorities.

“A fugitive is an individual who has a final order of removal and has absconded,” Brigham said.

Although Cuba is named by the State Department as a state sponsor of terrorism, under U.S. law Cubans who escape from their native country and successfully reach U.S. soil are allowed to remain in the country. After one year and one day, they can apply for permanent resident status, which is granted unless the individual has committed a crime that could lead to deportation.

Brigham and Barbara Gonzalez, another spokeswoman with ICE, told CNSNews.com that the special status given to Cubans can be revoked for criminal conviction, but they could not confirm whether or not the 137 Cubans that were in ICE custody in fiscal 2007-2009 and are now listed as “fugitives” had criminal records.

When asked why illegal aliens from “countries of interest” or those from state sponsors of terrorism were released inside the United States after being detained, Brigham said that the number of illegal aliens undergoing immigration-law processing in the United States makes it impossible to keep all of them in custody.

“On any given day, the immigration detention system has about 32,000 beds available for people going through immigration proceedings,” Brigham said. “There are 1.6 million people going through some kind of immigration court proceeding. So you can’t detain everyone.”

Brigham said individuals that meet “mandatory detention” requirements, such as conviction for a certain classes of crimes, or who are determined to be a flight risk are the first to be assigned a detention space.

“We have to prioritize who we put in detention,” she said.

Of the 481 illegal aliens from state sponsors of terrorism and countries of interest who were initially detained in fiscal years 2007-2009 and who are now fugitives, 430 are male, 50 are female and the gender of one, according to the database, is “unknown.”

–Edwin Mora contributed to this report.

http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/70944

Presenting the People of DHS:

People related to U.S. Department of Homeland Security:

R. Rand Beers – under secretary for national protection
Alan D. Bersin – assistant secretary
Rafael Borras – under secretary
Brian De Vallance – senior counselor to the secretary
Ivan K. Fong – general counsel
Alexander G. Garza – assistant secretary
David F. Heyman – assistant secretary for policy
Noah Kroloff – chief of staff for policy
Jan Lesher – chief of staff for operations
Jane H. Lute – deputy secretary
David A. Martin – acting general counsel
John T. Morton – assistant secretary for immigration & customs enforcement
Janet A. Napolitano – secretary
Esther M. Olavarria – deputy assistant secretary
John S. Pistole – assistant secretary
Phil Reitinger – deputy under secretary
Richard L. Skinner – inspector general
Sean Smith – deputy assistant secretary, public affairs
Caryn A. Wagner – under secretary

Other current U.S. Department of Homeland Security relationships:

A-Tek, Inc. – contractor
Accenture Ltd. – contractor
Acquisition Solutions, Inc. – contractor
Advanced Resource Technologies, Inc. – contractor
Akamai Technologies Inc. – contractor
Analytic Services Inc. – contractor
Analytical Research, LLC – contractor
Aoac International, Inc. – contractor
Ardent Management Consulting, Inc. – contractor
Beacon Group LLC – contractor
Blackstone Technology Group – contractor
Burke Consortium Inc. – contractor
Centra Technology, Inc. – contractor
Chartech, Inc. – contractor
Conference Board – contractor
Creative Computing Solutions, Inc. – contractor
Defense Group, Inc. – contractor
Detica Federal, Inc. – contractor
Eastport Analytics, Inc. – contractor
Electronic Biosciences LLC – contractor
Enertechnix, Inc. – contractor
Griffin Analytical Technologies, LLC – contractor
Gryphon Scientific, LLC – contractor
Isys, LLC – contractor
LAZ Parking – contractor
LRS Federal LLC – contractor
Management Concepts, Inc. – contractor
Mason Harriman Group, Inc. – contractor
Metis Group Inc. – contractor
National Cybersecurity Center – division
National Electrical Manufacturers Association – contractor
National Protection and Programs Directorate – division
New Editions, Inc. – contractor
Orizon, Inc. – contractor
PCI Communications, Inc. – contractor
Preferred Temporary Services Inc. – contractor
Qualcomm Inc. – contractor
Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. – contractor
Rhevision Technology – contractor
RHG Group, Inc. – contractor
Secure Solutions International Inc. – contractor
ServiceSource – contractor
Stratecon LLC – contractor
Synkera Technologies Inc. – contractor
Technical and Management Resources, Inc. – contractor
Tier Tech International, Inc. – contractor
Transcom Inc. – contractor
Transportation Security Administration – division
Universal Systems and Technology – contractor
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services – division
U.S. Coast Guard – division
U.S. Customs and Border Protection – division
U.S. Fire Administration – division
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement – division
U.S. Intelligence Community – member agency
U.S. Secret Service – division
Veridical Research and Design – contractor
Wiikno, Inc. – contractor
William F. Hawk Consulting, Inc. – contractor
Xtec, Incorporated – contractor

U.S. Department of Homeland Security past relationships:

Charles E. Allen – assistant secretary for intelligence
Cresencio S. Arcos – assistant secretary for international affairs
Stewart A. Baker – first assistant secretary
Michael Chertoff – secretary
Jay M. Cohen – under secretary for science & technology
Elaine Duke – under secretary
Clark Kent Ervin – inspector general
Federal Emergency Management Agency – division
Edmund S. Hawley – assistant secretary
Tracy A. Henke – assistant secretary
Caroline C. Hunter – executive officer
Asa Hutchinson – under secretary for border and transportation security
Donald Kent – assistant secretary for legislative affairs
Bernard B. Kerik – secretary nominee
James M. Loy – deputy secretary
C. Suzanne Mencer – director, Office for Domestic Preparedness
Philip J. Perry – general counsel
Thomas J. Ridge – secretary
Lora Ries – acting director, mission operations
Gale D. Rossides – senior adviser to the deputy secretary
Paul A. Schneider – deputy secretary
Erroll G. Southers – assistant secretary nominee
Jeffrey R. Sural – deputy assistant secretary
Chad C. Sweet – chief of staff
Pamela J. Turner – assistant secretary for legislative affairs
C. Stewart Verdery Jr. – first assistant secretary
Scott Louis Weber – senior counselor to the secretary
Amit Yoran – director of national cyber security
http://www.muckety.com/U-S-Department-of-Homeland-Security/5001899.muckety
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One Response to Department of HOMEland Security – should be dismantled – this organization leaves the American people without security. This organization and it’s leaders should be investigated and charges of TREASON should be administered SWIFTLY and executed in the most transparent way possible.

  1. payne says:

    I SEEN TWO DRONES FLAY OVER MY HOUSE AT ABOUT 800FT NEXT TIME I SEE ONE I’M SHOOTING IT DOWN WITH MY RESERCH GRADE 240V 1 KELVAN HELIUM ARGON LASER!

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